Gala Premiere, Friday, December 25, 1931 @ both 2:15 and 8:15 PM
Regular Engagement: Saturday, December 26, 1931 - Monday, January 26, 1932 (5 Weeks)
Hell Divers
Starring Wallace Berry and Clark Gable
Directed by George Hill
A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Picture
109 Minutes

SID GRAUMAN PROLOGUE "With 100 Artists," including Daisy and Violat Hilton

Chinese Symphony Orchestra, Oscar Baum, conducting

"Desert Regatta" with Pete Smith / Directed by Jules White / A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Short Subject

Reported Gross "Hell Divers" @ 50¢ - $1.50
Week
Week Ending
Perfs.
Gross
1
Thursday, December 31, 1931
14
$33,000
2
Thursday, January 7, 1932
14
$28,350
3
Thursday, January 14, 1932
14
$15,000
4
Thursday, January 22, 1932
14
$17,953
5
Monday, January 26, 1932 (4 Days)
8
$19,000
Totals
32 Days
Daily Average: $3,541
--
--
5 Weeks
Average Performance: $1,770
64
$113,303
Source: Motion Picture Herald
 
 
Grand Premiere, Thursday, January 28, 1932
Regular Engagement: Friday, January 29 - Sunday, March 13, 1932 (7 Weeks)
Mata Hari
Starring Greta Garbo and Ramon Navarro
Directed by George Fitzmaurice
A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Picture
89 Minutes

a: Stockholm - Birthplace of Garbo

b: "Chalk It Up" with Pete Smith and Willie Hoppe / Directed by Zion Myers / A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Short Subject

c: Overture Graumanesque / Grauman's Chinese Symphony Orchrsta, Oscar Baum, conductor


SID GRAUMAN PROLOGUE

Scene I:

"Street in Paris" - Before the War - La Petit Cafe. Characters: Vendors, Artists, Gendarmes, Soldats, Flowers Girls, Midinettes, etc.

A: Dance - The French Can-Can - Now the Rage in Paris

B: Paul and Nino Ghezzi - Former features of the Follies Bergere

C: Paul Gregory - Late star of "Whoopee"

D. Monsieur Stetson - "Something New in Chapeaux"

E. Fritz and Jean Hubert - "Entertainers of a Vintage"

F. Ensemble Militaire


Scene II:

"The Fountains of Versailles"

A: Paul Gregory

B: Rosemary Deering - Premiere Danseuse, Opera Comique and The Fan
Ensemble

C: Finale - "Disappearing Diving Ballet"

Julius K. Johnson at the console of the World-Famous Grauman's Chinese Theatre Organ

Intermission of 8 Minutes


Tuesday, February 2, 1932

Film House Reviews - Chinese - Hollywood, Jan. 28.

Wrapped in the tinsel of three weeks and a new record at the Capitol, New York, 'Mata Hari' (M-G) qualified in advance as the most important Hollywood opening since the last snowfall out here. Everyone except Garbo herself was present for a characteristic film premiere.

In the show that came before the picture Sid Grauman sinned on the side of lavishness, and would have had a better entertainment if remembering that brevity is the essence of engrossment. Those changes that will be made after the premiere should have been made before. Reported out, and meriting the slap, was Glenn and Jenkins. This act reaped the inevitable result of standing still year after year and trading on a reputation. They couldn't even milk a solitary bow at the curtain.

It remained for two acrobatic turns to provide the punches. That's rather a habit with acrobats in this era of vanishing crossfire turns. Paul and Nino Ghezzi had the studio mob as close to bravoes as they ever get for mere vaudeville. To the superhuman marvels of muscular might the Ghezzis postscripted an inverted blackbottom dance upon their hands alone, and a show knotter.

Other dumb act to find the target with facile accuracy was Fritz and Jean Hubert, whose limber-legged drunk routine is classic pantomime in the east, although possibly new out here. It certainly was to the chortling first-nighters. Several studio nabobs were utterly amazed when the femme member pulled the wig.

Paul Gregory's singing of 'That's Why Darkies Were Born' had two disadvantages. It brought to mind comparisons with Everett Marshall to the perambulatory studio mob, and it wasn't built up either for Gregory by the production or for himself in his own opportunity.

An unprogrammed ballerina was exceptional, while the chorus contributed several excellent ensembles, notably their opening French can-can, which they never thereafter topped. A disappearing ballet for a finale hardly repaid the time, trouble or expense involved. It was sheer excess, along with Glenn and Jenkins, who had to provide their own laughter for their gags of yesteryear. Probably sensing the birth of hen fruit, they did an extremely ragged performance and failed to get laughs even on the one or two standards they must have been pinning their hopes on.

To mark the Garbo event Grauman picked up a travelog on Stockholm which failed to live up to its advance announcement. A Metro short of Willie Hoppe, the billiardist, was good for some ahs and gasps of wonderment and a few laughs.

Land.

Added Sunday, March 6, 1932:

Eddie Cantor "in the flesh" one week only - no advance in price

Reported Gross "Mata Hari" @ 50¢ - $1.50
Week
Week Ending
Perfs.
Gross
1
Wednesday, February 4, 1932
13
$30,000
2
Wednesday, February 11, 1932
14
$24,600
3
Wednesday, February 18, 1932
14
$23,000
4
Wednesday, February 24, 1932
14
$20,000
5
Wednesday, March 2, 1932
14
$15,000
6
Wednesday, March 9, 1932
14
$24,000
7
Sunday, March 13, 1932 (4 Days)
8
$15,500
Totals
46 Days
Daily Average: $3,329
--
--
7 Weeks
Average Performance: $1,671
91
$152,100
Source: Variety

 

Wednesday, March 9, 1932
Eddie Cantor (40) Forecourt Ceremonies
   
Gala Premiere, Thursday, March 17, 1932 @ 8:30 PM
Regular Engagement: Friday, March 17 - Tuesday, April 5, 1932 (3 Weeks)
The Wet Prarade
Starring Dorothy Jordan and Robert Young
Directed by Victor Fleming
A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Picture
118 MinutesOverture:
Grauman's Chinese Symphony Orchestra,
Oscar Baum, conducting

Organ Prelude:
Julius K. Johnson
At the Console of the Mighty Wurlitzer


SID GRAUMAN'S NEW PROLOGUE

Veiled Lady

Cane Strutters - Beauty on Parade

Oriental Fantasy

Arnaut Brothers - "The Two Loving Birds"

Joe and Pete Michon - Funsters Extraordinary

Grand Finale - "Here Comes the Bride"
Tickets during regular engagement: $.50, $.75, $1.00
"Note: The magnitude of the performance demands that you be there on time."
Premiere Master of Ceremonies Wallace Beery will introduce the stars of "The Wet Parade" Dorothy Jordan, Robert Young, Walter Huston, Lewis Stone, Jimmy Durante, Neil Hamilton, Myrna Loy, John Miljan, Wallace Ford

Premiere tickets: $5.00


Tuesday, February 2, 1932

Film House Reviews - Chinese, L. A. - Hollywood, March 17.

Because every act made good the new Grauman show tops the divertissement that was prelude for 'Mata Hari.' It is also a faster entertainment, more securely fastened together, less dedicated to flashy but speed-checking spectacularity.

Talent is mostly standard, but that isn't always a guarantee of getting over at the Chinese at a picture first night. While not precisely tough the audience is discriminating and does withhold of grant recognition to stage folks. They are perhaps less exacting in standards where strictly studio personalities are concerned. After all, everybody's been everybody else's guest out here.

Oscar Baum and his pitmen, especially the brass, giving forth abundantly. His overture was a fine showmanly effort and won exceptional attention for a department usually taken with little heed like the olio.

Dancing battalion did not have anything as arresting as the Can-Can of the 'Mata Hari' prolog yet ably preserved interest. A giant veiled lady painted on a cut-out with a movable arm set the motif for the first number. Fanchon & Marco, credited for the dances, proceeded on the sound assumption that a chorus with clothes on is frequently, perhaps generally, more appealing, prettier, sexier, than the reverse.

Joe and Pete Michon, Mryna Fortune, Steve Moroni, brought sheer muscular agility to be seen. Arnaut Brothers, Zelda Santley, Edna Ericko brought audibility. Sight and sound coalesced into a good Sid Grauman presentation, more vaudeville than Grauman, perhaps, but times and styles in prologs have changed along with the type of picture now given $2 runs.

Arnauts have kept intact their knack for ingratiation. They started a trifle slow, but built steadily into audience favor. Zelda Santley was another slow, or at least uncertain starter. Hers was no midget undertaking, imitating picture people before a picture audience. It was not settled for the beginning that they were going to like her. Ultimately they decided they did. She has some extremely clever impersonations, seemingly new and, if so, probably capable of more marked accentuation. Either Miss Santley herself or a competent writer can unquestionably strengthen several of the bits for the laugh chances are an open invitation.

On appearance, Miss Santley rated 100% in a modish tailored velvet that spelled class. She was on an ascending curve when she fell afoul of Helen Morgan, an impersonation that mimics seem unable to resist. That let the curve flatten out somewhat, but she had a safe margin. If personal affection for the Morgan takeoff is too great to be brushed aside, it would at least be a help to clip the length to somewhere near her other bits.

While garnering some giggles nobody would be vexed in all likelihood if the first, gabby section of the Michons was whittled down to the bone. The started pyramiding the snickers into guffaws when hopping onto that reliable apparatus. Always a good dependable comedy team.

Myrna Fortune, of elastic vertebrae, chased her legs around her own chin while the chin caressed the floor. Other demonstrations of like nature aroused awe and applause. Steve Moroni did inverted twisting nip-ups, mittless frontovers, and otherwise added to the tag end of one of the chorus numbers.

When the stage show was finally over, blessedly sooner than Grauman, the lavish, generally permits, Wallace Beery came from the wings to everyone's surprise and evident delight. He gracefully and without smartalecking introduced the members of the cast, Dorothy Jordan, Neil Hamilton, Robert Young, Walter Huston, and finally, completely king of the situation and wearing a green rhinestone cane, Mr. Jimmy Durante. Going to Hollywood parties every night but still not James—just mister—the sawdust Cyrano grabbed the opportunity to engrave his personality on the swell shirtfronts. He was the only articulate member of the cast to be introduced. Orchestra gave him a few bars to get off strutting. Durante was entirely unawed by the Chinese.

With 'Grand Hotel' not ready and 'Tarzan' destined for $2 the dark horse 'Wet Parade' proved a happy filly. It was a cinematic narrative with an idea behind it.

Land.


Reported Gross "The Wet Parade" @ 50¢ - $1.00
Week
Week Ending
Perfs.
Gross
1
Wednesday, March 23, 1932
13
$13,500
2
Wednesday, March 30,1932
14
$12,200
3
Tuesday, April 5, 1932 (6 Days)
12
$10,000
Totals
20 Days
Daily Average: $1,785
--
--
3 Weeks
Average Performance: $915
39
$35,700
Source: Variety


Wallace Beery and his wife, Rita Gilmore, at the microphone during the premiere of The Wet Parade.


An issue of The Playgoer, dated Monday, March 28, 1932 (2nd Week), exisits for this engagement.


 
  Wednesday, April 6, 1932 - Thursday, April 28, 1932 (3 Weeks):

THEATRE DARK
 
 
Grand Premiere, Friday, April 29, 1932 @ 8:30 PM
Regular Engagement: Saturday, April 30, 1932 - Sunday, July 10, 1932 (11 Weeks)
Grand Hotel
Starring Greta Garbo and John Barrymore
Directed by Edmund Goulding
A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Picture
112 Minutes


Awarded "Best Picture" by AMPAS, November 18, 1932, Fiesta Room, Ambassador Hotel


A: "Swing High" with Pete Smith and The Flying Codonas / Directed by Jack Cummings / A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Short Subject

B: Overture - Johann Strauss Melodies, Oscar Baum, conductor


SID GRAUMAN PROLOGUE

Street Scene "Grand Hotel" Night Time - Any City

Ben Omar - The Dancing Bootblack

Society Street Dance Contest

Paula DeCarlo and Robert Eson

Elaine and Teske

Buddy and Gretel

Dorothy and Harry Dixon - Burlesque Dancers

Gary and Joyce - Bellhop Crooners

The Caligary Brothers - English Pantomimists

Street Entertainers: Mildred Nehamkin, Fred Zimbalist, Florence

Will Mahoney - "Why Be Serious?"

Finale


Intermission

LeRoy Prinz, Assitant to Sid Grauman


Premiere Master of Ceremonies: Will Rogers
--
Premiere broadcast over NBC, Conrad Nagel, host


" 'Grand Hotel' will be showing no where else in L.A. City of County this season."


Tuesday, May 3, 1932

Film House Reviews - Chinese - Los Angeles, May 2.

Because Greta Garbo is about to leave the country, opening night audience for 'Grand Hotel' (film) gave credence to the announcement that she would take a bow from the stage after the picture. However, this proved a misguided practical joke in very bad taste when a stagehand, in burlesque attire, took the spotlight. Incident constituted a shocking anti-climax to the classiest opening Hollywood has seen in two years.

Sidewalk gawks were much more numerous, but public turnout was still short of the turbulent mobs of yesteryear.

Identification stickers were used for the first time in years on cars, and courtyard of the theatre was arranged as a hotel desk, with Conrad Nagel, Lawrence Grant and Hedda Hopper as greeters at the register signed by celebs.

Radio mikes were hooked up nationally between 9 and 9:30 p. m. and had Miss Hopper gushing over the ladies' gowns.

W. R. Hearst, taking a bow from the audience, alluded to the ordeal and told anecdote of Negro in jail crying, 'Let me out of here, I ain't done nothing.' Whereupon Will Rogers, from stage, retorted, 'I'm not so sure about that,' for biggest laugh in connection with the ceremonies.

Rogers kidded Louis B. Mayer about Hoover saying it looked for a while as if Mayer was Hoover's only friend, and that the weather get so hot sometimes in Washington that even Mayer can't stand it.

Grauman, assisted by LeRoy Prinz, has a fine prolog, despite a similarity between acts and too much length. Facade of hotel showing up to the third floor, with action tableaux in each window, was a wow background for the entire presentation, excepting Will Mahoney, who worked in one before drapes.

Presentation opened fast with Omar, whose acrobatic gyrations made it tough for all the action turns following. But all the acts individually registered, including Dorothy and Harry Dixon, hoke dancers; Caligary Brothers, English drunk pantomimists, and Florence Hin Low, Chinese child contortionist. For novelty, Harry Bayfield, as a mother duck, laid a giant egg from which emerged a brood of live birds. Other programmed talent was Fred Zimbalist, Mildred Nehamkin, Gary and Hoyse.

Will Mahoney got over solidly with his xylophone dance, closing the show. Flying Codonas in Pete Smith's M-G sport short, preceded Oscar Baum's orchestral medley.

Expectations of a 20-weeks' run at the Chinese are officially expressed, but nearer 12 is a safer guess in this town, where $2 is a lot of money. In combination with Sid Grauman's prolog, 'Grand Hotel' is and probably will continue to be the best entertainment in town. Together they may be able to run through the Olympic games at the end of July.

—  Land.

Wednesday, May 18, 1932:

Grauman's Chinese Theatre 5th Birthday Today

Reported Gross "Grand Hotel" @ 75¢ - $1.50
Week
Week Ending
Perfs.
Gross
1
Thursday, May 5, 1932
13
$35,200
2
Thursday, May 12, 1932
14
$30,000
3
Thursday, May 19, 1932
14
$29,000
4
Thursday, May 26, 1932
14
$25,000
5
Thursday, June 2, 1932
14
$28,000
6
Thursday, June 9, 1932
14
$23,500
7
Thursday, June 16, 1932
14
$22,000
8
Thursday, June 23, 1932
14
$20,600
9
Thursday, June 30, 1932
14
$19,000
10
Thursday, July 7, 1932
14
$20,000
11
Sunday, July 10, 1932 (3 Days)
6
$14,571
Totals
73 Days
Daily Average: $3,313
--
--
11 Weeks
Average Performance: $1,668
145
$241,871
Source: Variety



Radio host Conrad Nagel welcomes Ms. Norma Shearer and Mr. Clark Gable before they "sign-in" at the registration book during the Grand Hotel premiere.



Issues of The Playgoer, dated Monday, June 20, 1932 (8th Week), and Monday, July 4, 1932 (9th Week), exisit for this engagement.

 
World Premiere, Friday, July 15, 1932 @ 8:30 PM
Regular Engagement: Saturday, July 16, 1932 - August 28, 1932 (7 Weeks)
Strange Interlude
Starring Norma Shearer and Clark Gable
Directed by Robert Z. Leonard
A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Picture
109 Minutes

"Color Scales" with Pete Smith / Directed by Zion Myers / A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Short Subject in Technicolor (2 color)
"Flowers and Trees" Silly Symphony in Technicolor (3-Strip) / Directed by Burt Gillett / A Walt Disney Production / A United Artists Release

Overture "Grand Opera Medly" Oscar Baum, Conductor


SID GRAUMAN PROLOGUE "A Night at the Olympics"

Staged and Directed by Sid Grauman


Dedication of the Coliseum
Grand Entrance of International Athletes

1. Jolpin Kiddie - Mascot of the American Athletes

2. Candreva Brothers - Unusually Unusual - Representing Italy

3. Gomez and Winona - International Dance Stars - A Waltz from Vienna

4. Madam des Vall's Prize-winning Russian Wolfhounds and South American Greyhounds - representing France (dropped from the program after opening night - ED)

5. Sanami and Michi - Japan's Foremost Dancers

6. Shaw and Lee - Representing Themselves - As is

7. The Maxellos - Equilibrists - Representing Germany

8. Gomez and Winona - Representing Spain

9. Frank and Milt Britton and Gang with Gene Gory and Tito - America's Smash Hit - Representing U.S.A.

10. Finale


Premiere Night Master of Ceremonies: Conrad Nagel
Forecourt Decorations by Benafels


Tuesday, May 3, 1932

Film House Reviews - Chinese, Hollywood - Hollywood, July 15.

Sid Grauman, always trying to keep abreast of the times and with the Olympic Games almost at hand, is providing 'A Night at the Olympics' as the current prolog in conjunction with the run of 'Strange Interlude.'

Atmospheric background he serves with it is a replica of the stadium center, colorful and full of sparkle. There is not a detail overlooked its construction or filling, even to the last tier, where he has placed as onlookers his famous collection of "dummies," which are taken out of the cellar archives every now and then. In the center tier is an impersonator of Gov. Rolph, who megaphones the start of the Olympic games, with the announcer then heralding the balance of the events. In the side sections are placed persons garbed to represent visitors from the various parts of the world, which gives the entire picture an interesting coloring.

Action starts with the parade of the contestants of all nations, carrying banners designating their representation. Is big hip-hip-hooray getaway and serves as prelude to the vaudeville portion. Latter is made up of nine acts, standard in their class, but not assembled on opening night to give one of those big-bang click performances that Grauman is noted for. Show ran 59 minutes and dragged during its middle portion. Seems as though variety selection for blending purposes was overlooked, but can be straightened out with re-assemblage and a possible addition of speed novelties.

Big moments of entertainment are supplied by the Frank and Milt Britton gang and Shaw and Lee, with the former all but panicking the audience in their spectacular finish, which brought a thunderous response from out front. The tornado of music and acrobatic knockabout antics of the Brittons are new here, and will be the talk of the cinema group, with some one trying to figure out how they can be injected into current cinematic endeavors.

Shaw and Lee routine was also something they were craving for, and in the middle of the bill had many a rib sore from laughter.

Joplin Kiddie, a mite of eight or nine, started off the entertainment portion with tap dancing, to make way for the Candreva aggregation, six of them, who rendered musical diversion on the trumpets. They were ushered out again later in the bill for a triple tongue rendition that scored.

Gomez and Winona, seen with 'Crazy Quilt' earlier in the season, had two spots in which they rendered a Viennese waltz and the 'Bolero.' Smartly clad, they gave the class touch to the stage show.

Samani and Michi introducing their Buddha worship, arm movements and dance, well lighted, had their turn preceding the Five Maxellos doing pedal equilibristics. Boy's routine started out very fast, but too much attention was given to comedy, using the taller member of the Shaw and Lee turn, which detracted from the audience's intended reaction at the finish. Several minutes of tightening of the routine can help matters greatly. Then, with the Brittons for the finish, matters perked up again, giving plenty of life to the proceedings with the knockdown and dragout finish.

Oscar Bohm (sic) provided a grand opera medley as the orchestral contribution, which provided plenty of sound for the rhythmic approach to their seats of the late arrivals.

Pete Smith's 'Color Scales' (M-G-M) (Talking Shorts) and Walt Disney's first United Artists' Silly Symphony, 'Flowers and Trees,' in Technicolor, provided the opening screen entertainment. Disney short had spontaneous reception and applause at finish. Technicolor treatment of these processed assemblages, adds class to the offering and opens the field of color to this type of short.

Ung. (Arthur Unger, Variety Los Angeles Bureau Chief.)


Reported Gross "Strange Interlude" @ 75¢ - $1.50
Week
Week Ending
Perfs.
Gross
Preem
Friday, July 15, 1932 ($5.50 Top)
1
$7,800
1
Monday, July 18, 1932 (3 Days)
6
$15,000
2
Monday, July 25, 1932
14
$28,100
3
Monday, August 1, 1932
14
$26,234
4
Monday, August 8, 1932
14
$25,000
5
Monday, August 15, 1932
14
$18,600
6
Monday, August 22, 1932
14
$14,600
7
Sunday, August 28, 1932 (6 Days)
12
$13,000
Totals
45 Days
Daily Average: $3,296
--
--
7 Weeks
Average Performance: $1,440
103
$148,334
Source: Motion Picture News / Motion Picture Herald

Sid Grauman, Norma Shearer and Irving Thalberg at the Strange Interlude premiere.


An issue of The Playgoer, dated Monday, August 1, 1932 (3rd Week), exisits for this engagement.
 
Gala World Premiere, Friday, September 9, 1932
Regular Engagement: Saturday, September 10, 1932 - Thursday, October 6, 1932 (4 Weeks)
Rain
Starring Joan Crawford and Walter Huston
Directed by Lewis Milestone
A United Artists Release
94 Minutes

"King Neptune" A Silly Symphony in Technicolor / Directed by Burt Gillett / A Walt Disney Production / A United Artists Release

"Overture of the Tropics" - Chinese Theatre Symphony, David Broekman, conductor


SID GRAUMAN PROLOGUE

Scene I
Chinatown, San Francisco, New Year's Eve

Authentic Chinese Wedding - Yang Oi Lup, Bride

Paul Jue - The Dancing Laundry Man

Sam Lahk - The McCormack of China

Long Tack Sam, supported by His Beautiful Daughters, Mi-na and Nee-sa
Lafayette and LaVerne - Dance Characterizations of the Underworld


Scene II

Pago Pago Island

Taumafatauga - Meaning, Native Celebration and Feast of Gratitude
Comprised of the following artists:

The Royal Samoans
Pearls of the Pacific
Leinaala
Lani
Avonee Gay Lee
Jack Miller and His Steel Guitar
Gomez and Wanda in "Tabu"

On the Hut Balcony - types and Characters of "Rain"

Eddie Gar - Inimitable Character Impressions

Finale - The Rain of the Tropics


Prologue Conceived and Produced by Sid Grauman
Assistant to Sid Grauman - LeRoy Prinz
Auditor - Frank Hundley
House Manager - Jack Stebbins
Director of Advertising and Publicity - Troy Orr
Exploitation - Sam W.B. Cohn
Treasurer - Basil Mallicoat
Assistant Manager - George Lundbar
Secretary - Gertrude Skall


Tickets: Mats: 50¢, ¢75, $1.00 Eves: 75¢, $1.00, $1.50


Tuesday, May 3, 1932

Film House Reviews - Grauman's Chinese - Hollywood, Sept. 9.

Current prolog put on by Sid Grauman with 'Rain' is stupendous in atmospheric embellishment. Talent is not expensive, still it includes four punch acts which, when routines, will give a well-blended and satisfactory stage entertainment.

Opening night prolog ran 72 minutes and caused Eddie Cantor, m. c. of the evening, to remark that Grauman was 'The Eugene O'Neill of the West.' However, as two of the acts did not hit town until 24 hours before the opening, Grauman need not plead guilty to the Cantor indictment. Show going on without preliminary pruning, can be nipped here and there, and will easily come in under the tape in 45 to 50 minutes. It lends itself to the pruning process, and value will not be impaired.

First section of show is presented in 'Frisco, Chinatown setting, opening with a New Year celebration and an authentic Chinese wedding ceremony. Paul Jae, Chinese hot rhythm stepper, gets the entertainment portion underway with his Harlemesque terpsichorean movements, while Same Lohk, dubbed as the "McCormack of China," chants a couple of ballads.

This paves the way for Long Tack Sam and his troupe. Sam has been touring the world and submits a radically different type of entertainment than he did before he parted from these shores. Has a troupe of 10, including his two daughters, Mi-na and Nee-Sa, which submits a variety of fast action feats, including juggling, dancing, equilibrium and gymnastics. He has pared the magic portion of his performance to the bone, and turned comedian. Is perfect m. c. for the act, is an apt showman and measures his conversational quips in various tongues, so that they come as high spots which are most effective. With the first section of prolog running 42 minutes opening night, the Oriental turn can be tightened and pared for seven to eight minutes and no values would be lost.

Closing this section was LaFayette and Laverne, which a modernistic knockabout and toss around underworld dance, that had a windup of the man tossing the woman into a crowded chop suey joint, with the cellophane giving way easily and the audience awed and thrilled at the daring finish.

Using the moving stage idea similar to the one he employed with 'Gold Rush,' in twenty seconds Grauman transformed the optical illusion to the exterior of the general store on Pago-Pago island. There the setting was typically atmospheric to the action of the picture. It had a colorful back and foreground, with the native Pollynesians (sic) providing entertainment on the eve of the rainy season. Types of the picture were assembled in the background, while the Royal Samoans did their stuff. Then came a trio of native dance characterizations, by Leinoala, Lana and Avonne Gaylee, as a prelude to the "Tabu" dance of Gomez and Winona. This duo, held over from the "Interlude" prolog, had a remarkable interpretation of Pollynesian dance rhythm, and presented the barbaric pantomime movements in exquisite tasteful and entertaining style, which gave the final section its first punch value. To close was Eddie Gar, a newcomer here, with his impressions of notable stage characters. They were a panic. The audience went daft at his portrayal of Jimmy Durante; he had it down to a 't' and the stiff shirts fronts in the auditorium gulped every word and movement when they saw with enthusiastic relishment. Closing, he gave his conception of Jim Barton's characterization of the drink moocher, which establishes him as a Hollywood favorite. Looks as though the picture gang will say 'come on around, we want to make a test,' and the boy may land, too. Finale, or course, had to be rain effects that wound up what will be a meritorious stage offering, after the surgical process is completed. 'King Neptune,' a Silly Symphony in Technicolor, was the entree offering. Though house was slowly filling, the six-minute novelty got great take off reception.

David Broekman, new conductor here, got off to a good start with his overture of the tropics. It was punchy throughout and only lasted four minutes, which is a miracle for the two-a-day house, where the orchestral portion generally runs 10 to 12 minutes. Mr. Grauman might do well in keeping this master in the pit, as he at least knows what a sufficiency is for an audience in his line.

Ung. (Arthur Unger, Variety Los Angeles Bureau Chief.)



Reported Gross "Rain" @ 75¢ - $1.50
Week
Week Ending
Perfs.
Gross
Preem
Friday, September 9, 1932 ($5.50 Top)
1
$8,200
1
Thursday, September 15,1932
14
$23,800
2
Thursday, September 22, 1932
14
$15,800
3
Thursday, September 29, 1932
14
$11,000
4
Thursday, October 6, 1932
14
$11,800
Totals
28 Days
Daily Average: $2,521
--
--
4 Weeks
Average Performance: $1,238
57
$70,600
Source: Variety

An issue of The Playgoer, of an unknown date, exisits at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Margaret Herrick Library for this engagement.
 
  Friday, October 7, 1932 - Wednesday, January 11, 1933 (13 Weeks):

THEATRE DARK
 
 
© Copyright graumanschinese.org. Background Photo: From the Terry Helgesen Collection of the Theatre Historical Society, Elmhurst, Illinios.