Friday, October 7, 1932 - Wednesday, January 11, 1933 (13 Weeks):

THEATRE DARK
 
 
Premiere, Thursday, January 12, 1933 @ 9:00 PM
Regular Engagement: Friday, January 13, 1933 - Sunday, February 19, 1933 (6 Weeks)
Cavalcade
Starring Diana Wynyard and Clive Brook
Directed by Frank Lloyd
A Fox Picture
110 Minutes
Awarded "Best Picture" by AMPAS, Thursday, March 16, 1934, Fiesta Room, Ambassador Hotel
Overture - Alois Reiser conducting the augmented symphony

SID GRAUMAN PROLOGUE "Montmarte"

1. Market Day—Montmarte—18th Century
2. Traveling Theatre - Gregory Golubeff's Moscow Art Ensemble
3. Gavotte
4. Royal Procession
5. Street Singer - Tudor Williams
6. Seizure of the King
7. Revolution by Torchlight
8. "A la Lanterne"
9. Machine Age
10. Street Singer

Montmartre—1933—Dawn
11. American Sailors - Long and Short
12. "Mon Pappa" - Entire Company
Curtain
--
Written by Reginald Berkeley
Directed by George Hadden
Musical numbers staged by Sammy Lee
Production Personally Supervised by Sid Grauman
Premiere Master of Ceremonies: Will Rogers. Broadcast over KHJ-CBS Network, hosted by Fred Niblo and James Dunn, from 8:30-9:30

Lt. Harold William Roberts and his Golden State Band

Stars Attending the Premiere:
Charles Chaplin / Frank Lloyd / Douglas Fairbanks / Winfield Sheeman / Helen Hayes / Clark Gable / Joan Crawford / Ruth Chatterton / Charles Farrell / F. R. Ken / Diana Wynyard / Bebe Daniels / Sally Eilers / Clive Brook / Herbert Mundin / Reginald Denny / Ronald Coleman / Spencer Tracy / Gary Cooper / Claudette Colbert / Victor McLaglen / Lilyan Tashman / Nancy Carroll / Edmund Lowe / Conrad Nagel / Wallace Beery / Constance Bennett / Lionel Barrymore / Richard Cortez / George Brent / Norma Shearer / Wheeler & Woolsey / Douglas Fairbanks Jr. / "and many others"

"Will Rogers Will Personally Introduce the Cast After the Showing of "Cavalcade"

Diana Wynyard / Clive Brook / Una O'Connor / Herbert Mundin / Beryl Mercer / Irene Browne / Tempe Pigott / Merle Tottenham / Frank Lawton / Ursula Jeans / Margaret Lindsay / John Warburton / Billy Bevan / Desmond Roberts / Dick Henderson, Jr. / Douglas Scott / Sheila McGill / Bonita Granville
Thursday, January 26, 1933
Diana Wynyard (26) Forecourt Ceremonies
Friday, February 17, 1933
The Marx Brothers, Chico (Leonard - 45), Harpo (Adolph - 44), Groucho (Julius - 42), Zeppo (Herbert - 31) Forecourt Ceremonies
 
Reported Gross "Cavalcade" @ 55¢ - $1.65
Week
Week Ending
Perfs.
Gross
Preem
Thursday, January 12, 1933 ($5.50 Top)
1
$7,480
1
Monday, January 16, 1933 (4 Days)
8
$16,400
2
Monday, January 23, 1933
14
$16,000
3
Monday, January 30, 1933
14
$16,000
4
Monday, February 6, 1933
14
$13,000
5
Monday, February 13, 1933
14
$14,500
6
Sunday, February 19, 1933 (6 Days)
12
$15,000
Totals
39 Days
Daily Average: $1,735
--
--
6 Weeks
Average Performance: $878
77
$67,680
Source: Variety
 
 
  Monday, February 20, 1933 - Thursday, March 23, 1933 (4 Weeks):

THEATRE DARK
 
 
Premiere, Friday, March 24, 1933
Regular Engagement: Saturday, March 25, 1933 - Thursday, April 13, 1933 (3 Weeks)
King Kong
Starring Fay Wray and Robert Armstrong
Directed by Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack
An R-K-O Radio Picture
100 Minutes

(A) Selected Short Subjects

(B) Overture: Grauman's Chinese Theatre Orchestra—Al Erickson, Directing

(C) SID GRAUMAN PROLOGUE "AScene in the Jungle"

Conceived and Staged by Sid Grauman
Leroy Prinz, Assistant to Mr. Grauman
Colton Cronin, Stage Director
Music and Lyrics by Ben Ellison and Harvey Brooks
Prologue and Picture Costumes by Western Costume

"A SCENE IN THE JUNGLE"

(1) The Voo-Doo Dancer
(2) Return of the Hunters
(3) Gathering of the Tribes
(4) Dance to the Sacred Ape
(5) The Captive
(6) "In the Tree Tops" with Pauline Loretta
(7) Eccentric Dance of the Zulus: Dudley Dickerson—Ruttledge and Taylor—The Two Sepias—The Bon Bons—Carl Gibson and Bobby Stevens
(8) The Safari
(9) Serge Flash—European Wonder
(10) Studies in Ebony—The Cacholats
(11) The Black Ballet
(12) Gloria Gilbert—America's Premiere Danseuse
(13) Entrance of the Queen and Her Court
(14) Jimmy Savo
(15) "Goodbye Africa"—Ensemble with Alma Travers and Marguerite Robinson
(16) Chilton and Thomas—Absolutely Individual
(17) Grand Finale—Ensemble

Chorus of Dusky Maidens and African Choral Ensembles
Free Forecourt Managerie
Matinees: 50¢, 75¢
Evenings: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00
Premiere tickets: $3.30.

Joel McCrea, Master of Ceremonies, over NBC Network Hookup.

Stars in Attendance:
Ann Harding / Dorothy Jordan / Fredric March / Florence Eldrige / Rouben Mamoulien / Irene Dunne / David O. Selznick / Robert Woolsey / Bert Wheeler / Charles Ruggles / Arlene Judge / Wesley Ruggles / Willam Boyd / Phil Harris / Johnny Wiesmuller / Diana Wynyard / Tom Keene / Eric von Stroheim / Laura Hope Crews / Sharon Lynn


Tuesday, March 28, 1933

Film House Reviews - Chinese, Hollywood - Hollywood, March. 24.

To maintain the general jungle atmosphere of the feature, "King Kong" (Radio), Chinese prolog is an all colored affair with the exception of the four principles, Jimmy Savo, Serge Flash, juggler; Pauline Loretta, bar act, and Gloria Gilbert, toe dancer. At the new top of $1, coupled with the screen entertainment, it's bargain day at the Chinese. Stage production is sock entertainment, one of the best prologs here in some time.
Opening is a pip flash in a jungle set that brought gasps. Negro chorus of 30 voices, plus a line of 40 girls and 10 men, are on for a typical Prinz fanny shaking routine. Prinz, one of the few men on the coast who can handle a colored chorus, has done good work with the mob. Miss Loretta, who comes on as a white captive, is placed in a cage with a fake gorilla, escapes, climbs to a tree top where her rigging is and goes into her act, Good bit of business with the girl swinging from the bar to a hanging rope for an escape finish. Following is another chorus number with the boys featured. Routine opens as an exotic jungle dance, and slowly works into a hot-cha number for a laugh finish.

Serge Flash follows. Class juggler is on too early, but manages to be a near show stopper. Both Flash and Savo work in full stage. Both would have been better received in front of a drop, the full stage and chorus detracting from their work. Flash, new here, socked them with his ball juggling.

The Cacholats, three man control balance act, followed. Boys have a short but sweet routine with no let up between the start and the finish. All of their balancing is three high. Line on for a mixture of hot and ballet dancing followed by Gloria Gilbert, toe dancer, featuring twirls. Latter are sensational in their speed.

Tableau next for the entrance of Savo with Jungle Queen for a laugh. Panto, comic, who went through his familiar clown act to heavy returns, could have encored but was satisfied with four bows.

Finale has Chilton and Thomas featured with Alma Travers and Marguerite Robinson singing behind the tap dancing team, all backed up by the chorus. Dancers are a strong finish, necessary after Savo's sock. Team is still doing its table dance. Routines bespeak their early training as Charleston contesters in Chicago. Everything they do can be traced to the Charleston winging, but they have perfected it to a point where they are among standout colored dancing teams on the stage.

With only three names in the cast, budget for the presentation is probably considerable under the cost of Grauman's previous shows.

Pit orchestra, under the direction of Al Erickson, who has been leading vaude house bands locally for several years, is oke. Erickson's leading is typical vaude stuff, necessary for this type of show and a relief from the usual concert type conducting familiar to this house.

Opening night, for the first time minus the sun arc ballyhoo, but nevertheless attracting a large crowd of fans, was capacity. Paper was scarce. House should have gotten away to a good cash start.

Call.


Reported Gross "King Kong" @ 55¢ - $1.00
Week
Week Ending
Perfs.
Gross
Preem
Friday, March 24, 1933 ($3.30 Top)
1
$2,500
1
Friday, March 31, 1933
14
$12,000
2
Friday, April 7, 1933
14
$11,000
3
Thursday, April 13, 1933 (6 Days)
12
$7,000
Totals
27 Days
Daily Average: $1,548
--
--
3 Weeks
Average Performance: $792
41
$32,500
Source: Variety

 
  Friday, April 14, 1933 - Thursday, June 1, 1933 (7 Weeks):

THEATRE DARK
Thursday, May 18, 1933:

Grauman's Chinese Theatre 6th Birthday Today
 
 
World Premiere, Friday, June 2, 1933 @ 8:30 PM
Regular Engagement: Saturday, June 3, 1933 - Sunday, August 13, 1933 (11 Weeks)
Gold Diggers of 1933
Starring Warren William and Joan Blondell
Directed by Mervyn LeRoy
A Warner Bros. Picture, presented in the New Wide-Range Sound
97 Minutes

Short Subject: "I Like Mountain Music" A Leon Schlesinger Cartoon / Directed by Dave Fleischer / Released by Paramount Pictures

Overture: Medley of Song Hits from "Gold Diggers of 1933"
Music and Lyrics by Harry Warren and Al Dubin
Orchestra under the direction of Georgie Stoll

SID GRAUMAN PROLOGUE "Hollywood As It Ain't"
--
Program as Listed in the Opening Night Program, Friday, June 2, 1933:
--
Staged by Larry Ceballos
Conceived by Sid Grauman
Lighting Effects by Frank N. Murphy
Dialogue by Eddie Welsh
Music and Lyrics by Con Conrad
Stage Manager - George Ormston
Company Manager - Colton Cronin

SCENE 1
Street Scene: The Brown Derby, Hollywood
Jean Malin - The Announcer
Autograph Hounds
The Studio Girls
Sam Ash - Late of "The Cat and the Fiddle" and star of many New York Shows
Robert Coleman - Page Boy
Clarence Nordstrom - of "42nd Street"

SCENE 2:
Interior of the Brown Derby

SCENE 3:
On the set - Warner Bros. Studio
Daffy Dill - Clarence Nordstrom, Dorothy Kent, Mildred Morris; ensemble of 60

SCENE 4
Radio Station K F W B - Hollywood
Three Radio Rogues - Jimmy Hollywood, Ed Bartell, Henry Taylor - Presenting your favorite radio stars

SCENE 5
A tourist's conception of a movie star's home
Jean Malin - The Movie Star
Entrance of the guests
The 16 Studio Girls - Youth, Beauty, Grace
Sam Ash, Marjorie Moore and Patricia White - "Play Fiddle Play"
A dance and vocal novelty - Hudson Wonders - They have no equal
"Raisin' the Roof" - Clarence Nordstrom and entire company

Joe E. Brown, Master of Ceremonies - Introducing the Stars of "Gold Diggers of 1933"


Tuesday, March 28, 1933

Film House Reviews - Chinese, Hollywood - Hollywood, June 2.

Sid Grauman is again on the horizon with a typical spectacle, flash and entertainment prelude to "Gold Diggers of 1933." It is a good box office balance to the main cinema epic. It will help, too, toward giving the trade a real $1.50 worth, which this picture had to do, as folks don't shill out that case and a half around here for straight screen fare.

Opening night at the Grauman offering ran around 63 minutes and was a bit spotty, too, due to the fact that a premiere here is nothing more than a dress rehearsal. That will be overcome when the show is shifted around and tightened up. Then it should run at a smooth, fast clip and be one of the best that the local boy has had in many a day. Cost on this one is not much, but it looks like a great deal, especially from the production atmospheric standpoint. Net cost to house for operation of stage and pit will hardly run over $3,500 weekly, and there are a lot of people who will devide this amount of coin among them for their weekly subsistence. Two sets are used. One is the exterior and interior of the Brown Derby, and the other is a palace set used for the final scene. Both are donations, with the latter coming from the Warner studio. Seems a little late for the Vine street Derby starting to exploit itself, as the star trade from that place has begun to drift casually to the Beverly Hills branch and is an important factor now toward the latter establishment's daily intake, especially at the noon hour.

Larry Ceballos did the staging, aided by Bill O'Donnell, with Grauman, of course, the head man. It is a corking good job, moulding those 36 girls and 24 boys into routine and symmetric entertainers within a 10-day period, which is all that Grauman feels is necessary to whip a show into shape. And it is only Grauman who manages to do it in that time.

Feature attractions with the prolog are the Three Radio Rogues (Hollywood-Bartell-Taylor), Hudson Sisters, Jean Malin, Sam Ash, Clarence Nordstrom, Marjorie Moore, Francia White and the 16 Metzger girls, executing a Tiller type of ballet and formation routine.

Show opens with Malin in front of Derby, appeasing the autograph hounds who want to get a glimpse of the stars dining inside. Malin pulls a couple of Eddie Welsh blackout gags, and then the breakaway platform reveals the inside of the eating emporium. This gives the Con Conrad lyric, "I'm the Stooge Who's the Stand-In for the Chief Stooge of the Studio," to be chanted by Malin. Lyrics have lots of gags, telling who the various stooges are. Lew Schriber is listed as the Zanuck main guy, Ida Koverman comes in for Louis Mayer, Jack Warner's are so numerous that they are herded together, as are the 47 cousins of Laemmle, Jr. Action in the Derby seems stilted and could be speeded a bit here and there through movement.

Third scene is in front of plush drapes, supposed to be inside the Warner studio (not a plug), with the 60 dancing demons doing a number, "Daffy Dill," led by Clarence Nordstrom (the everlasting juvenile). This is a fat flash ensemble and was the first actual movement of the show.

Then comes the big punch, the Radio Rogues. This trio just goals them for about 12 minutes of impressions of ether luminaries, and stops the show cold. Nothing can follow them and register, and looks as though they will have to be moved down to the next-to-closing spot of the bill to give the others a chance.

Closing scene is the interior of the film stars' home. Opening has 16 boys and girls doing a butler and maid routine. Then Malin, attired as Mae West, takes command of the situation with a chant. It is all his here. Crowd is stunned in seeing Malin in the femme togs a la West. But he gives it to them aplenty, and they absorb it as a sponge does water. Then come introductions of various star dupes, with a couple of ensemble routines and a flash at the Hudson Wonders, who came from the Folies Bergere, Paris. These gals have a fast contortionistic, acrobatic and dance routine, which is, however, disjointed. There are waits after every trick. This slows the youngsters up. The routine should be snapped together and given in snap order, and the kids then will be a riot instead of just pleasing, as they were opening night. Finale is the usual ensemble formation and bow-off, pretentious and colorful.

Georgie Stoll is in the pit with a 14-piece combination. It opened with a medley of "Gold Diggers" numbers, with Stoll doing fiddle solo and a tenor chanting, for no reason at all. Overture can stand cut. Stoll, in handling the show baton, did one of the most proficient stick-wielding jobs seen hereabouts in years. "I Like Mountain Music," a Leon Schlesinger short, served as the seating wait proceding the show start, and proved to be a wow. Those that muffed it misses something worth while in the cartoon line.

House filled to capacity opening night, with show breaking half-hour after the new day began.

Ung. (Arthur Unger, Variety Los Angeles Bureau Chief.)

Program as Listed in Monday, June 19, 1933 Issue of "The Playgoer"
--
Staged by Larry Ceballos
Conceived and Supervised by Sid Grauman
Dialogue by Eddie Welch and Sid Grauman
Special Musical Score by Con Conrad
Lighting Designer - Frank L. Murphy
Stage Supervisor - Colton Cronin

SCENE I
Street Scene - Brown Derby - Hollywood
Autograph Hounds
The Studio Girls
Sam Ash - late of the "Cat and the Fiddle" and star of many New York shows
Robert Coleman - page boy
Clarence Nordstrom - of "42nd Street" fame

SCENE II
Interior of the Brown Derby

SCENE III
On the set - Warner Bros. Studio
Daffy Dill - led by Clarence Nordstrom
with
Dorothy Kent and Mildred Morris, Jack and Bob Crosby and ensemble

SCENE IV
Lowe, Burnoff & Wensley
International Dancing Comedians

SCENE V
Station K F W B
America's Premiere Mimics
The Three Radio Rogues - Jimmy Hollywood, Ed Bartell, Harry Taylor
presenting your favorite radio stars

SCENE VI
A Tourist's Conception of a Movie Star's Home
Entrance of the Stars
Janet Gaynor - Katherine Snell
John Barrymore - John Alban
Greta Garbo - Chris Marie Meeker
Constance Bennett - Charlotte Jones
Diana Wynnard - Amron Isle
Jack Gilbert - John Gustin
Jean Harlow - Jean Ames
Joan Blondell - Jean Blair
Charlie Chaplin - Eugene Verde
The 16 Studio Girls - youth, beuaty and grace
"Rasin' the Roof - Clarence Nordstrom and the entire company
Finale

FOR MR. GRAUMAN
Director, Advertising and Publicity - Harry Hammond Beall
Stage Manager - George Ormston
House Manager - George Lundberg
Auditor - Frank Hundley
Secretary - Gertrude Skall
Treasurer - Basil Mallicoat
Assistant Treasurer - Robert Edney
Assistant Treasurer - Gladys Nolan
Assistant Treasurer - Floyd Bevers


Matinees at 2:20: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00, Evenings at 8:20: 50¢, $1.00, $1.50


Stars attending the premiere:

Joe E. Brown, Master of Ceremonies / Marie Dressler / William Powell / Kay Francis / Joan Crawford / Mervyn LeRoy / Jack L. Warner / Al Jolson / Ruby Keeler / Clark Gable / Edward G. Robinson / The 4 Marx Brothers / Wallace Beery / Clarence Brown / James Cagney / Cecil B. DeMille / Loretta Young / Joan Blondell / Warren William / Ann Dvorak / Glenda Farrell / Margaret Lindsay / Helen Vinson / Guy kibbee / Claire Dodd / Frank McHugh / Patricia Ellis / Allen Jenkins / Sheila Terry / Ruth Donnelley / Busby Berkeley / Alfred E. Green / Lloyd Bacon / William Wellman / Roy Del Ruth / Archie Mayo / Michael Curtiz / William Dieterlie / Ned Sparks / Tammy Young / Sterling Holloway / Ferdinand Gottschalk, Ginger Rogers / Joan Bennett / Gene Markey / Leatrice Joy / Ruth Rowland / Pat O'Brien / Douglas MacLean / May Robson / Wallace Ford / Harry Warren / Al Dubin / Leo Forbstein

Premiere Tickets: $5.00


Tuesday, June 27, 1933:

"Today is Joan Blondell Day - in Person at 8:20 PM Performance"
Friday, July 28, 1933 at 11:30 PM:

Special Kiwanis Midnight Show: "Gold Diggers of 1933" and the regular program, plus announcements from the stage.

Reported Gross "Gold Diggers of 1933" @ 50¢ - $1.50
Week
Week Ending
Perfs.
Gross
Preem
Friday, June 2, 1933 ($5.00 Top)
1
$5,000
1
Thursday, June 8, 1933
14
$21,000
2
Thursday, June 15, 1933
14
$19,000
3
Thursday, June 22, 1933
14
$18,700
4
Thursday, June 29, 1933
14
$19,000
5
Thursday, July 6, 1933
14
$21,100
6
Thursday, July 13, 1933
14
$17,300
7
Thursday, July 20, 1933
14
$20,000
8
Thursday, July 27, 1933
14
$16,000
9
Thursday, August 3, 1933
15
$15,400
10
Thursday, August 10, 1933
14
$19,000
11
Sunday, August 13, 1933 (3 Days)
6
$10,000
Totals
74 Days
Daily Average: $2,723
--
--
11 Weeks
Average Performance: $1,361
148
$201,500
Source: Variety

An issue of The Playgoer, dated Monday, June 19, 1933 (2nd Week), exisits at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Margaret Herrick Library for this engagement.
 
Premiere, Tuesday, August 29, 1933 @ 8:15 PM
Regular Engagement: Wednesday, August 30, 1933 - Sunday, October 8, 1933 (6 Weeks)
Dinner at Eight
Starring Marie Dressler and John Barrymore
Directed by George Cukor
A Metro-Goldywn-Mayer Picture


"Hollywood Pemiere" (AKA: "Mickey's Gala Premiere") starring Mickey Mouse / Directed by Burt Gillett / A Walt Disney Production / Released by United Artists

"Fine Feathers" narrated by Pete Smith / Directed by Jules White / A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Picture in Technicolor


SID GRAUMAN PROLOGUE


Tuesday, September 5, 1933

Variety House Reviews - Chinese, L. A. - Hollywood, Aug 29.

There's a flock of class in Sid Grauman's prolog to "Dinner at Eight." but with a picture that runs more than two hours, embellished by a Pete Smith short and a Mickey Mouse cartoon, the stage end of the program needs considerable cutting. Opening night, the performance (prolog and pic) started at 9:10, broke at 1:15 a. m., and there were no holdups.

Prolog is in two sections. First half represents entertainment of the 90's, latter half is modern theatre. Setting for the first part is similar to the piece used by Fred Karno in his "Night in an English Music Hall" with occupied boxes on either side of the stage. Orchestra in the pit all wear handlebar muffs, indulge in musical renditions of the period including 'Over the Waves' as a trumpet solo, triple tongueing and everything. Overture got away to a great start with a flock of the names in the audience having their memories jogged by remembering earlier days.

Opening has the line girls doing an olf-fashioned can-can routine in front of an advertising backdrop. Following are the Three Cossacks, skaters. Trio has three fast routines, get the show off to a hot start. Next is the 'Florodora' sextet singing 'Oh, Tell Me Pretty Maiden." This is another laugh getter for the old-timers. Ruth Harrison and Alex Fisher follow in a slow waltz which can be eliminated. Team is to (sic) classy to have it opening with this dance, particularly considering the impressionistic dance in the second half which stops the show cold. Latter effort is the same routine they did with 'Strike Me Pink' in New York last season. Class performers, they should do something in pictures while on the Coast.

Radio Rubes next. Quartete slow to start, build to a strong finish with their hoke vocalizing, but stay on too long. Offering should be limited to three numbers. George Pentiss and his Punch and Judy show follow. Prentiss scores with his raspberry bit.

Harrison and Fisher open the second half of the prolog with their 'Manhattan Serenade'' Working in white silk costumes before a black cyc, they exude class from start to finish. Kitchen Pirates follow, with a control kick number by the line. Adagio quartet knocks the opening night audience silly with sensational cathes. Gary Leon catcher for the group, rates consideration from pictures.

Buck and Bubbles, next to closing. Colored team indulges in too much stalling, taking the edge off their work. Chatter is hard to hear in the large house with the address system turned off. Later when the loud speakers went into action, lads got a better break, but the stalling continued.

Closing is a 'happy days are here again' affair, a good finish for the prolog with everybody working in a routine similar to 'Forgotten Man' from 'Gold Diggers.'

Cut from 75 minutes to about 50, prolog should be one sock following another.

Call.


An unused ticket from the day before the "Dinner at Eight" premiere; theatre was dark that day, so it is a mystery.



The chorus line for the Grauman Prologue to Dinner at Eight pose on the roof of the theatre.

  Program as listed in Monday, September 18, 1933 issue of "The Playgoer"

"Hollywood Pemiere" (AKA: "Mickey's Gala Premiere") starring Mickey Mouse / Directed by Burt Gillett / A Walt Disney Production / Released by United Artists

"Fine Feathers" narrated by Pete Smith / Directed by Jules White / A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Picture in Technicolor


SID GRAUMAN PROLOGUE
Conceived and produced by Sid Grauman
Assistant to Mr. Grauman - Miss Dorthy Berke - Jack Lester

The scene is the stage of the Grand Opera House, many years ago.

I.
Overture by the Silvertone Orchestra
Directed by Georgie Stoll

II.
24 Nifties
who are "Strolling through the Park"
The Hudson Metzger Girls

III.
The Three Cossacks
A Fast Pace in a Small Space

IV.
A Big Surprise
First appearance of these beauties west of the Weehauken River

V.
George Prentice
with "Punch and Judy"

VI.
Ruth Harrison—Alex Fisher
"The Gavotte"

VII.
The Radio Rubes
Featuring Rufe Davis, Artie Hall and John and Neele Labey

VIII.
Impressions of "Manhattan Serenade"
by Harrison and Fisher

IX.
The Hudson-Metzger Girls
Youth, Beauty and Rhythm

X.
Peggy Taylor and Gary Leon
They are the "Kitchen Pirates"

XI.
Buck and Bubbles
The Sensation of the Theatre World

XII.
The Grand Finale
--
The words and music of the finale march in Sid Grauman's prologue, "We're Behind You, Mr. President" were composed by Mr. Georgie Stoll, conductor of the Chinese Orchestra.
--
The display of bells in the Fore-Court of Grauman's Chinese Theatre is from the world famous collection of of the Mission Inn at Riverside, California, California, and is exhibited through the courtesy of Mr. Frank Miller.
--
During the engagement of "Dinner at Eight" we are serving the delicious "Eight Oclock Coffee", thru the courtesy of A & P Food Stores, during intermission in the Fore-Court.
--
FOR MR. GRAUMAN
Director, Advertising and Publicity - Frank Whitbeck
Stage Manager - George Ormston
Company Manager - C. Colton Cronin
House Manager - George Lundberg
Auditor - Frank Hundley
Secretary - Gertrude Skall
Treasurer - Basil Mallicoat
Assistant Treasurer - Robert Edney
Assistant Treasurer - Gladys Nolan
Assistant Treasurer - Floyd Bevers
Monday, September 25, 1933:

Jean Harlow Footprinting Ceremony before the 8:30 PM showing of "Dinner at Eight." Stories vary, but the block imprinted onstage this day was runined somehow, with another ceremony done in the forecourt during the day on Friday, September 29, 1933.


An issue of The Playgoer, dated Monday, September 18, 1933 (2nd Week), exisits for this engagement.

Monday, September 25, 1933
Jean Harlow (22) Imprint Ceremonies (on Stage)
Friday, September 29, 1933
Jean Harlow (22) Forecourt Ceremonies (in Forecourt)
 
Reported Gross "Dinner at Eight" @ 55¢ - $1.65
Week
Week Ending
Perfs.
Gross
1
Wednesday, September, 1933
(Including $5.00 Preem)
13
$32,000
2
Wednesday, September 13, 1933
14
$26,000
3
Wednesday, September 20, 1933
14
$18,000
4
Wednesday, September 27, 1933
14
$18,600
5
Wednesday, October 4, 1933
14
$16,450
6
Sunday, October 8, 1933 (4 Days)
8
$16,500
Totals
39 Days
Daily Average: $3,271
--
--
6 Weeks
Average Performance: $1,656
77
$127,550
Source: Variety
 
 
Premiere, Thursday, October 12, 1933 @ 8:30 PM
Regular Engagement: Friday, October 13, 1933 - Sunday, November 19, 1933 (5 Weeks)
I'm No Angel
Starring Mae West and Cary Grant
Directed by Wesley Ruggles
A Paramount Picture
87 Minutes

SID GRAUMAN PROLOGUE "Under the Big Top"
Matinees at 2:15: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00; Evenings at 8:15: 75¢, $1.00, $1.50
"Will not be shown in any other theatre in Southern California for months and months."


Tuesday, October 17, 1933

Variety House Reviews - Chinese, Hollywood - Hollywood, October 12.

For the stage show to accompany 'I'm No Angel' at its $1.50 local showing, Sid Grauman has provided an atmospheric prolog to the picture by presenting nine applause acts, all drawn from the sawdust.

Opening night with one of the acts out because its equipment wasn't rigged, ran five minutes over an hour. Asaw's Elephants, slated for the closing spot, but cut out the first night, now opens the show, which is going through the Grauman process of elimination and build-up, since the opening performance always is a final dress rehearsal.

Acts are circus outstanders, well blended and presented. They almost all rate strong reaction, with the May Wirth Family; Ray Hauling and his seal; George and Jack Dormonde, cyclists; Ferry Corwey, and Carlton Emmy's pets, getting the best returns.

David Ross, brought from the east, leads the pit orchestra through a punchy overture which is followed by Philip Escalante, wire-walker, who can speed up considerably. The Dormondes, crack comic cyclists, follow and mop up. They can eliminate some of their bike polo routine. Winnie and Dolly, ring, trap and iron jaw workers, are on next and go over smartly on the strength of the man's sensational trapeze finish.

Emmy's hounds stick to a platform and a jumping routine, providing plenty of smooth comedy. Tom Lomas troupe follow for their regulation stilt work. When Cary Grant, opposite Miss West in the picture, was introduced, he thanked Grauman for using the act, with which he made his showbiz start.

Plenty of novelty in Ferry Corway's musical clowing. Starts off with bell ringing, so old that it is almost new again. Then graduates to a zither-like contraption and winds up with a horn-tooting number. Audiences like Corway.

Ray Hurling and his seal do their standard turn to big returns, followed by the Wirth family, the closer. Restricted by a small ring, the group works a bit slow, but the clowing of Fritz and the hippodrome finish of May Wirth build up to a flashy finish and an applause closer.

Grauman has provided an authentic circus background, stuffing the stands with dummies. Ringmaster does a neat job of announcing. Several clowns do walk-throughs, but fail to tease any abdominal chuckles.

Disney's 'Lullaby Land' opens the show.

Leny.


Reported Gross "I'm No Angel" @ 50¢ - $1.50
Week
Week Ending
Perfs.
Gross
Preem
Thursday, October 12, 1933 ($5.50 Top)
1
$7,500
1
Wednesday, October 18 1933
(5 Days)
10
$28,000
2
Wednesday, October 26, 1933
14
$22,000
3
Wednesday, November 2, 1933
14
$18,400
4
Wednesday, November 9, 1933
14
$17,700
5
Wednesday, November 16, 1933
14
$14,000
6
Sunday, November 19, 1933 (4 Days)
8
$8,000
Totals
38 Days
Daily Average: $3,042
--
--
6 Weeks
Average Performance: $1,541
75
$115,600
Source: Variety


Ms. West and Mr. Grauman at the premiere of I'm No Angel.

 
World Premiere, Monday, November 27, 1933
Regular Engagement: Tuesday, November 28, 1933 - Sunday, December 17, 1933 (3 Weeks)
Roman Scandals
Starring Eddie Cantor and Ruth Etting
Directed by Frank Tuttle and Busby Berkeley
A Sam Goldwyn Production / A United Artists Release
92 Minutes

SID GRAUMAN PROLOGUE "The Sidewalks of New York"

Program as listed in Monday, December 4, 1933 issue of "The Playgoer"

Grauman's Chinese Theatre Orchestra
David Ross, Director
A Medley of Eddie Cantor Song Successes

Sid Grauman presents "The Sidewalks of New York"
Conceived and Staged by Mr. Grauman
Assistant - LeRoy Prinz

The cradle of the world . . . the melting pot of the universe. Here life flows on . . . pleasently, beautifully . . . for some—tragically for the less fortunate. Here romance buds and love flowers. But always there is life—and . . . laughter—thrill and excitement.

The People and Pets of the Neighborhood—

Pansy the Horse
Ettore Campana - The Street Singer
Marvin Ravitz - The Boy Caruso
Gordon, Reed & King - 3 Young Men of Manhattan
Jue Fong
Larry Adler - Protege of Eddie Cantor—Maestro of the Harmonica
Nell Kelly - The Madcap
The Picchiani Troupe
Pops and Louie - By Arrangement with N.B.C.
Miss Fay Courtney - The Lazybones Mammy

Together with the Neighbors from Far and Wide
--
EXECUTIVE STAFF FOR MR. GRAUMAN:
Director Advertising and Publicity - Frank Whitbeck
Stage Manager - George Ormston
Company Manager - C. Colton Cronin
House Manager - George Lundberg
Auditor - Frank Hundley
Secretary - Gertrude Skall
Treasurer - Basil Mallicoat
Assistant Treasurer - Robert Edney
Assistant Treasurer - Gladys Nolan
Assistant Treasurer - Floyd Beavers


Grauman's Chinese Theatre is perfumed with the fragrance of Charbert's "Merchante" (Naughty)
Daily at 2:15 and 8:15


Tuesday, December 5, 1933

Variety House Reviews - Chinese, H'wood - Hollywood, November 27.

Ten fine acts, a set that gets applause on the curtain lifting and clever segues combine to form one of the finest prologs that Sid Grauman has given this house. For 'Roman Scandals' (UA), Grauman presents 'The Sidewalks of New York.' Set, a la 'Street Scene,' is so realistic that it deserves special mention. It is also peopled by 100 extras.

While all the acts are outstanding, Nell Kelly, Pops and Louie, Larry Adler, the Picchiani Troupe and Pansy the Horse are tops.

Gordon, Reed and King, dancing trio, open the bill, tapping astutely and displaying good headwork as well as nimble legs.

Work of Pansy the Horse overshadows similar but less effective gyrations of the cloth equine used by Tom Loomis troupe in the last Chinese prolog. Routine is staggered well to build up all the way. On the heels of this comes a four-team adagio number that depends on fast spins for a sustained volley of applause. Fay Courtney does two numbers, the first solid. Makes the mistake of doing a love song second.

Entrance of the crack Picchiani troupe is beclouded by a bakery plug, as they come on in a truck of an L. A. bread company. Once they get started, the seven men do about everything possible on a teeterboard.

Jue Fong, Chinese tenor, scored with an operatic and an Irish song and was followed by Larry Adler, who gets practically everything but a new money standard out of a harmonica. Youth should correct a tendency to gesture and direct the orchestra and can mellow some of tones, but aside from that his mouth organ work is wham.

Adler is the first of three acts that bring the show down to its curtain. Middle one is Nell Kelly, back after years in the east, with a mop of reddened hair. Speed, comedy and top-notch kicking characterizes her turn.

Also able to stand up capably following two big applause acts is Pops and Louie, colored youngsters, who harmonize in a Mills Brotherly manner and then clean up with their juvenile hoofery. They took a deserved encore and several bows.

Finish had snow falling amid Christmas preperations, with Marvin Ravitz caroling 'Holy Night.' Slow and a bit long opening night but set for slashing. Everything tied together with neatly staged business and atmosphere.

A picturesque Magic Carpet (Fox) opened the program with scenes of rural England. That and a five minute oeverture of Eddie Cantor song, batoned by David Ross, took up 15 minutes of the hour and a quarter program leading up to the feature.

Strong opening campaign with Sam Goldwyn throwing plenty into the pot for additional advertising. Opening night about capacity. LeRoy Prinz assisted Grauman on the prolog.

Leny.


Reported Gross "Roman Scandals" @ 50¢ - $1.50
Week
Week Ending
Perfs.
Gross
Preem
Monday, November 27, 1933
($5.50 Top)
1
$5,500
1
Sunday, December 3, 1933
14
$19,000
2
Sunday, December 10, 1933
14
$11,000
3
Sunday, December 17, 1933
14
$9,000
Totals
21 Days
Daily Average: $2,119
--
--
3 Weeks
Average Performance: $1,035
43
$44,500
Source: Variety

An issue of The Playgoer, dated Monday, December 4, 1933 (2nd Week), exisits for this engagement.
 
Saturday, December 23, 1933 - Sunday, January 28, 1934 (4 Weeks)
Little Women
Starring Katherine Hepburn and Joan Bennett
Directed by George Cukor
An R-K-O Radio Picture
115 Minutes

"The Night Before Christmas" A Silly Symphony in Technicolor / Directed by Wilfred Jackson / A Walt Disney Production / A United Artists Release

Overture: Songs of Long Ago
Grauman's Chinese Theatre Orchestra, David Ross, Conductor

SID GRAUMAN CHRISTMAS PROLOGUE
with Paul Draper, Albertina Rasch Ballet, Adohr Opera of the Air Singers (augmented)

Scene 1—A New England home in 1860
a. Grandfather's Clock—Jackie Hughes
b. Then You'll Remember Me—Roy Russell and Wynne Davis
c. Love's Old Sweet Song—Jackie Hughes
d. Knitting Maids—Rausch Girls. Little Women—Dianna Douglas, Wynne Davis, Jesse Cole, Estella Veles

Scene 2—Glen
a. Song—Romany Life (the villagers greet the gypsies)
b. Call of the Woodlands—William Felix Knight and Ensemble
c. Dance of the Gypsies—Rausch Girls
d. Vilia—Francis White
e. Operatic Wrangle—Carmen and Faust—Tudor Williams, Fred Scott, arl Cowan, Emmett Casey, and the Misses White and Wynne Davis
f. Dancing Diversions—Fred Draper
g. Albertine Rausch Ballet and Ensemble
h. Finale—At the Clearing

Staged by Sid Grauman and Max Schek
Edward Lester, Voice Director
Saturday, January 27 and Sunday, January 28, 1934
Shows at 2:15, 3:45, and 8:15
 
© Copyright graumanschinese.org. Background Photo: From the Terry Helgesen Collection of the Theatre Historical Society, Elmhurst, Illinios.