Saturday, April 30, 1927
Douglas Fairbanks (44) and Mary Pickford (35) Forecourt Ceremonies
   
Wednesday, May 18, 1927
Norma Talmadge (33) Forecourt Ceremony
   
World Premiere, Wednesday, May 18, 1927, at 8:30 PM
Regular Engagement: Thursday, May 19, 1927 - Sunday, October 30, 1927 (24 Weeks)
King of Kings
Starring H.B. Warner and Dorothy Cumming
Directed by Cecil B. DeMille
A Pathé Exchange Release with Technicolor Sequences
155 Minutes

SID GRAUMAN PROLOGUE, "Glories of the Scriptures"

Overture - Grauman's Chinese Symphony Orchestra, Constantin Bakaleinikoff, conductor; Frederick Barr Scholl at the mighty organ

Locale - the meeting place of the populace
I. Twilight prayers of the common people
II. Dance of the Ebony Slave - Maurice Morgan
III. Dance of the Palms - Theodore Kosloff Dancers
IV. Chant of the Isrealite High Preists
V. "The Holy City" Stewart Brady - The Boy Soprano

Tableaux
A. Joseph and his Brethren (Just after his sale into slavery)
B. Daniel in the Lion's Den
C. The Star of Bethlehem
D. The Nativity
E. The Flight into Egypt
F. The Spirit of Faith

Costumes in "The Spirit of Faith" conceived and supervised by Adrian
House Manager - H. Ellis Reed
Assistant to Mr. Grauman - Lester Cole
Chorus Master - Vladimir Bakaleinikoff

Musical Score for "King of Kings" personally created and directed by Dr. Hugo Reisenfeld, with orchestrations by Otto Potoker
Pre-curtain music by the Julia Keller Harpists

Personal Staff for Mr. Grauman:
Auditor - F. W. Hundley
General Press Representative for Mr. Grauman - Harry Hammond Bell
Director of Publicity - Robert Shaw Doman
Director of Special Events - Everett Jones
Publicity Director - Robert M. Finch
Art Director - George E. Holll
Technical Director - George Ormston
Superintendent - S. S. Marsh
Musical Supervisior - M. Eisoff
Health Director - Dr. L. J. Huff
Secretary to Mr. Grauman - Chas. H. Chapin
Scenic Artist - Frederick Robinson
Stage Carpenter - William Thorneycraft
Chief Electrician - George Smith
Chief Projectionist - Edward Keller
Chief Property Man - Si Beard
Treasurer - John T. McGuire
Assiatant Treasurer - M. A. Anderson
Assiatant Treasurer - B. B. Mallicoat
Assistant Treasurer (at Owl Drug Co.) - Cliff Bernard
Assitant Treasurer (at Wurlitzer Co.) - Gordon Gerster
Premiere Seats $11.00 each. Fred Niblo introduced David Wark Griffith, Master of Cerimonies, who presented the Hon. Will Hays; and Miss Mary Pickford, who had the honor of pressing the jade button that began the premiere performance.

The same program as was presented at the opening premiere will be repeated twice daily at 2:15 and 8:15 PM during the run of "The King of Kings" at Grauman's Chinese Theatre

PRICES AND RESERVATIONS

Evening Prices: 75¢, $1.00, $1.50
Matinee Prices: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00 Monday to Friday; 75¢, $1.00 Saturday and Sunday
Holiday Matinee Prices: 75¢, $1.00, $1.50
U.S. Excise Tax Additional

Box office open daily from 9:30 AM to 10:00 PM. Seats on sale at box office two weeks in advance. Mail orders sent in previously will be filled day sale opens. Seats ordered in advance by telephone, or at box office in person, or by mail, will be held until 1:15 for matinees and 7:15 for evening performances. Paid reservations will, of course, be held indefinitly. For special convenience of Los Angeles patrons, downtown box offices are maintained at Owl Drug Co., 6th and Hill. Tickets are also sold at the following locations:

The May Co., at Broadway, 8th and Hill Streets
Broadway Department Store at Broadway and Hill Streets
McColloch Drug Co., with stores at:
6th and Vermont
3rd and La Brea
9th and Spring
Santa Barbara and Figueroa
Dillion-Stone Drug Co. at 6th and Western
Student's Book Store at the University of Southern California
Rivoli Pharmacy at 54th and Mesa Drive
Abbott & Reniue at 48th and Western
Seventh Avenue Pharmacy at West Washington and 7th Avenue
Blue Cross Drug Store at 1100 North Vermont Avenue
Duncan Electrical Store at 2891 West Pico Street
Gloria Pharmacy at 10th and Norton

In Hollywood at:
Myer's Pharmacy at 7529 Melrose Avenue
Gardner Pharmacy at 7500 Sunset Bouelvard
Savoy Drug Store at Sunset and Bronson

In Long Beach at:
Long Beach Drug Co. at Ocean Avenue and Pine
Pacific Coast Club

In Whittier at:
Robbins Pharmacy at Greenleaf

In Huntington Park at:
B & O Drug Co. at 266 South Pacific Boulevard

In Walnut Park:
Brawley's Pharmacy

In Anaheim at:
Heying's Pharmacy

In Redondo at:
Hughes Drug Store at 523 South Broadway

In Culver City at:
Van Dussen Pharmacy at 6644 West Washington Boulevard

In Sawtell at:
Smith Drug Co.

In Santa Monica at:
Santa Monica Drug Co. at 310 Santa Monica Boulevard

In Santa Ana at:
Mateer's Pharmacy

In Beverly Hills at:
Okey Drug Co.

In Inglewood at:
Clint's Pharmacy at 201 North Market Street
Malloy's Pharmacy at 222 East Queen Street

In Compton at:
Dean's Pharmacy at 205 East Main Street

In Alhambra at:
Munson Drugs at 31 West Main Street

In San Bernardino:
Base Line Pharmacy at Base Line and E Street
Towne-Allison Drug Store, Store No. 3 at 3rd and E Streets
Torrance-Dolley Drug Co.

In Pomona at:
M. E. Fellows Druggist at 201 West 2nd Street

In Fullerton at:
Doty's Pharmacy
In Highland Park at:
Montgomery's Pharmacy at 5400 Monte Vista

In San Pedro at:
Beacon Drug Store No. 4 at 1047 Pacific Avenue

In Burbank at:
Welch-Golay Drug Co. at 1-2 East San Fernando
Riverside-Keystone Pharmacy

In Morovia at:
Klein's Pharmacy

In San Diego at:
Thearle Music Co. at 640-646 Broadway

In Pasadena at:
Liggett's Drug Store at 1 East Colorado Street

In Glendale at:
Liggett's Drug Store at Broadway and Grand Boulevard

Telephone number at Grauman's ChineseTheatre Pagoda Box Office: GLadstone 5184.

Reported Gross "King of Kings"
Week
Week Ending
Perfs.
Gross
1
Saturday, May 21, 1927 (3 Days)
6
$35,000
2
Saturday, May 28, 1927
14
$29,000
3
Saturday, June 4, 1927
14
$28,000
4
Saturday, June 11, 1927
14
$29,000
5
Saturday, June 18, 1927
14
$25,000
6
Saturday, June 25, 1927
14
$27,500
7
Saturday, July 2, 1927
14
$27,500
8
Saturday, July 9, 1927
14
$26,500
9
Saturday, July 16, 1927
14
$26,500
10
Saturday, July 23, 1927
14
$27,500
11
Saturday, July 30, 1927
14
$26,000
12
Saturday, August 6, 1927
14
$25,000
13
Saturday, August 13, 1927
14
$26,000
14
Saturday, August 20, 1927
14
$25,000
15
Saturday, August 27, 1927
14
$24,000
16
Saturday, September 3, 1927
14
$22,500
17
Saturday, September 10, 1927
14
$21,000
18
Saturday, September 17, 1927
14
$17,000
19
Saturday, September 24, 1927
14
$14,750
20
Saturday, October 1, 1927
14
$13,000
21
Saturday, October 8, 1927
14
$14,000
22
Saturday, October 15, 1927
14
$17,000
23
Saturday, October 22, 1927
14
$20,000
24
Sunday, October 30, 1927 (8 Days)
16
$27,000
Totals
165 Days
Daily Average: $3,477
--
--
24 Weeks
Average Performance: $1,735
330
$573,750
Source: Film Daily Yearbook, 1928



Miss Mary Pickford in Mr. Grauman's promotional areoplane.

Monday, August 1, 1927
Norma Shearer (25) Forecourt Ceremonies
   
World Premiere, Friday, November 4, 1927, @ 8:30 PM
Regular Engagement: Saturday, November 5, 1927 - Sunday, January 22, 1928 (12 Weeks)
The Gaucho
Starring Douglas Fairbanks and Lupe Valez
Directed by F. Richard Jones
A United Artists Release
115 Minutes

SID GRAUMAN PROLOGUE, "Argentine Nights"
--

Program as listed in the premiere program from Friday, November 4, 1927:
--
Argentine Overture
Played by Grauman's Chinese Theatre Orchestra
Conducted by Arthur Kay; William Davis, Organist,
--
Sid Grauman's Prologue
"Argentine Nights"
Conceived and Staged by Sid Grauman
Lester Cole, Assistant
--
1. Opening-Argentine Pastimes.
2. La Jota Dance-Triana and Antoinette, and Ensemble.
3. Senorita Cordova, Castanet Dancer.
4. Acrobatic Fantasy, Leonard St. Leo.
5. Gaucho Chorus, "White Men's Gold."
6. Indian Rain Dance.
7. Gaucho Marimba Band.
8. Mariano Del Gado, Musical Gourd Player.
9. Samuel Pedraza, South American Tenor.
10. Harry White and Alice Manning, Comedy Dancers.
11. Borrah Minnevitch and Argentine Rascals.
12. Finale.
--
Gauchos, senoritas, padres, soldiers, Indians, water carriers, peasants, cigarette girls, sheephearders, musicians and flower girls, celebrating the annual fiesta of their country
--
Scene-Argentine Village in the shadow of the Andes
(Order of prologue subject to change)
--
INTERMISSION
There will be an intermission of eight minutes after the first part of the prologue. The Chinese gong in the forecourt will be sounded to announce the beginning of the second part.
--
Conrad Nagel - Matser of Ceremonies (Opening Night)
--
Please remain seated after the running of the picture, as the cast will be personally introduced.
--
Premiere Seats $5.50 each.



Wednesday, November 9, 1927

Film House Reviews - Grauman's Chinese, (Hollywood) - Hollywood, Nov 4.

Sid Grauman pulled the second opening in the career of this house and it was a pip. They were all there in their smartest gowns and jewelry galone (sic). And $5 to sit in. Few Annei Oakleys in the house and the intake ran better than $9,000 on the night.

Sid gave them the greatest and most expensive stage presentation in the history of his operation in Hollywood. The show will help Doug Fairbanks' "The Gaucho" cash in for at least three months.

Grauman calls this one "Agentine Nights." The set is an Argentine village in the shadow of the Andes. It's similar to those erected in the studios and as substantial. Plus the lighting, it's extremely effective. Grauman spent dough and it shows.

Some 100 people on the rostrum, with not a dull moment during the 55 consumed. It was the smoothest opening performance Grauman has ever had, its length meaning encores. The cheif clickers in the order that they scored were Borrah Minnevitch and his harmonica boys, Harry White and Alice Manning, and after that the Gaucho Marimba band, picked up by Grauman in San Diego. When Sid gets the show running regularly this same mob can do their stuff in less than 45 minutes.

Opening had the entire ensemble on stage with a Padre informing it was a festive day. They started in by chanting after which Triana and Antoinette, mixed team, did an Argentine routine aided by a mixed octette. This was fast stepping and pleasing. A chorus of 16 men then did "White Men's Gold," which was the gap before a quartette of Indians came on and did the Andes rain dance. Whether this dance was Andes or American only Sid knows, but for the cash buyers went for it. Then came the seven marimba pounders, who after specializing accompanied Samuel Pedraza, South American tenor, for a couple of numbers. The band then served as a background for Mariano Del Gado who extracted weird tunes from a gourd, a musical instrument shaped something like a cucumber. It was a new one for the crowd with Del Gado, if that is his right name, somewhat of a comic.

White and Manning speeded it up some more. This duo, brought on especially from the east, are new locally and found the mob a pushover. Looks as though when they finish here it will be a pipe for them if they like California. The picture houses and productions will surely want them. Next to shut came Borrah Minnevitch and his 13 boys. The gang rushed on pell mell in grotesque costumes and went right into their stuff. It was a panic and turned out to be a case of how long Minnevitxh wanted to stay on.

With the entertainment having attained a high point, the padre announced the day of festivity was over and it was time for prayer. There was chanting from offstage with the players entering the church as the drapes were drawn.

Grauman clicked with this one and it warrants the Fairbanks picture being sold at $1.50 top. Arthur Kay conducted the orchestra, providing as the prelude a catchy overture entitled "Argentine." It was a medley of South American and Spanish numbers that blended. The pit crew of 45 or so have an easy time during the prolog as most of the music is supplied by the stage specialties. —Ung. (Arthur Unger, Variety Los Angeles Bureau Chief.)

  Program as listed in the undated handout program for "The Gaucho":
--
SID GRAUMAN PROLOGUE, "Argentine Nights"
Conceived and Staged by Sid Grauman, Lester Cole, assistant

Argentine Overture, Played by Grauman's Chinese Theatre Orchestra, Conducted by Arthur Kay; Organist, William E. Davis

1. Opening-Argentine Pastimes
2. La Jota Dance-Triana, Antoinette, and Chorus
3. Indian Rain Dance
4. Gaucho Marimba Band
5. Samuel Pedraza, South American Tenor
6. Mariano Del Gado, Musical Gourd Player
7. Harry White-Alice Manning, Comedy Dancers
8. Borrah Minevitch and Argentine Rascals
9. Finale
--
Gauchos, senoritas, padres, soldiers, Indians, water carriers, peasants, cigarette girls, sheephearders, musicians and flower girls, celebrating the annual fiesta of their country
--
Scene-Argentine Village in the shadow of the Andes
--
Order of Prologue subject to change
--
There will be an intermission of eight minutes after the prologue. The Chinese gong in the forecourt will be sounded to announce the beginning of the picture.


These undated programs were presented to patrons during the run of The Gaucho, The acts listed in the prologue differs from the opening night program.
Monday, November 21, 1927
Harold Lloyd (44) Forecourt Ceremonies
Monday, November 28. 1927
William S. Hart (63) Forecourt Ceremonies
Monday, December 12, 1927
Tom Mix (47) and Tony the Wonder Horse (18) Forecourt Ceremonies
  Added Friday, December 16th, 1927:

"The New Ford Car"

"Presenting, for the first time on any stage, in a magnificent setting, the new Ford Sedan, Standard Coupe & Sport Roadster, these new and exclusive models have just been received from Detroit. Special lighting effects and musical score. Entire presentation conceived by Sid Grauman. Performances at 2 and 8. Preceded by a special feature film "The New Ford Car" - showing the manufacture and assembly of the new car at the factory."


Conductor Arthur Kay in a publicity shot taken after "The New Ford Car" opens; the wheels of the car are just visible in the upper right.
Monday, December 19, 1927
Colleen Moore (28) Forecourt Ceremonies
Unknown date, 1927
Gloria Swanson (28) Forecourt Ceremonies
Unknown date, 1927
Constance Talmadge (29) Forecourt Ceremonies
 
Reported Gross "The Gaucho"
Week
Week Ending
Perfs.
Gross
1
Saturday, November 5, 1927 (2 Days)
3
$35,000
2
Saturday, November 12, 1927
14
$24,000
3
Saturday, November 19, 1927
14
$24,000
4
Saturday, November 26, 1927
14
$24,000
5
Saturday, December 3, 1927
14
$22,900
6
Saturday, December 10, 1927
14
$17,800
7
Saturday, December 17, 1927
14
$14,900
8
Saturday, December 24, 1927
14
$15,500
9
Saturday, December 31, 1927
14
$19,000
10
Saturday, January 7, 1928
14
$27,500
11
Saturday, January 14, 1928
14
$15,000
12
Sunday, January 22, 1928 (8 Days)
16
$15,000
Totals
80 Days
Daily Average: $3,139
--
--
12 Weeks
Average Performance: $1,579
159
$251,100
Source: Film Daily Yearbooks, 1928-1929
 
 
West Coast Premiere, Friday, January 27, 1928
Regular Engagement: Saturday, January 28, 1928 - Sunday, April 29, 1928 (14 Weeks)
The Circus
Starring Charles Chaplin and Merna Kennedy
Directed by Charles Chaplin
A United Artists Release
70 Minutes

SID GRAUMAN PROLOGUE - "Ballyhoo"

Staged by Mr. Grauman

Overture: "A Trip to the Side Show" Played by Grauman's Chinese Theatre Orchestra, Will Prior, Conductor

Scene-An Old Fashioned One Ring Circus
Samarnoff and Sonia
Pepito, the Clown
Ed and Jenny Rooney
The Dancing Horse
Three Freehands
Slayman Ali Clowns
Pallenberg's Bears
Poodles Hanneford, world's greatest circus star
Finale

Ringmaster, bareback riders, attendants, peanut vendors, freaks, musicians, acrobats, sword swallowers, strong man, and a galaxy of clowns

Wells Hively, Organist
Cigarettes by Lickter's Chinese Smoke Shop
White Rose Spring Water used in this theatre
Premiere Seats $5.50 each.


Wednesday, February 1, 1928

Film House Reviews - Grauman's Chinese, (Los Angeles) - Los Angeles, Jan 27.

Sid Grauman has put this particular stage attration on because of "The Circus." with Charlie Chaplin, running but 70 minutes. So he spent a bit of dough to put on an atmospheric entertainment in the interior of an old-fashioned one-ring circus. On the outside of his theatre are the menagerie cages, freaks, etc. They were right in the foyer and welcoming the incoming guests on opening night. Then, too, Sid gave a lot of pink lemonade and hot dogs at the intermission in the frecourt of the theatre. That's all for $1.65 top.

Sid has an orchestra of around 50 in the pit. Will Prior is conductor. Prior had one of those old-time overtures, with songs of the days when you were a boy, which served as a prelude to the opening scene. That scene was the outside of the side show with the boys doing the ballyhoo, just as they do on the big lot. Sid trotted out all of his sideshow freaks, from the contortionist to the tall guy and the fat girl and the midget. He did not miss a detail. That scene was not long either, about eight minutes.

The drapes were then flown, and one saw the interior of a circus tent. The big top was up and the patrons were in the bleachers. Those patrons were wax figures, too. There is many a near-sighted booker in vaude who would have thought they were alive.

First to take the big announcement from the guy with the walrus mustache were Samaroff and Sofia, with their acrobatic dogs. Great to get a show under wal (way) as the turn is fast and a flash. Pepito, musical clown, next with a short specialty, and then worked during the interludes. While they were waiting between the first and second scenes there was a pretty good male singer, who gave them "Pagliacci" in clown costume. Just atmospheric.

After Pepito the Rooneys—Ed and Jenny—in aerial trapeze work. They supplied plenty of thrills with their stunts. Then Jenny came back alone and gave the cash buyers a few more thrills on her own. Three Freehands, boys, dud their gymnastic and perch work, which went over smashingly. Slayman Ali and his Blue Devils, eight, trotted out for their whirlwind stuff. Then Pallenberg's Bears, which always clicks.

After that was the piece de resistance—Poodles Hanneford and his family. Out-andout show toppers as well as house fillers.

Not a bad show all around, and none too expensive. —Ung. (Arthur Unger, Variety Los Angeles Bureau Chief.)



These undated programs were presented to partons during the run of The Circus; the acts listed in the prologue differ from those mentioned in the Variety House Review.
Monday, April 2, 1928
Pola Negri (31) Forecourt Ceremonies
 
Reported Gross "The Circus"
Week
Week Ending
Perfs.
Gross
1
Saturday, January 28, 1928 (2 Days)
3
$17,600
2
Saturday, February 4, 1928
14
$30,000
3
Saturday, February 11, 1928
14
$30,150
4
Saturday, February 18, 1928
14
$29,000
5
Saturday, February 25, 1928
14
$29,500
6
Saturday, March 3, 1928
14
$27,000
7
Saturday, March 10, 1928
14
$25,000
8
Saturday, March 18, 1928
14
$22,500
9
Saturday, March 24, 1928
14
$21,000
10
Saturday, March 31, 1928
14
$19,000
11
Saturday, April 7, 1928
14
$24,000
12
Saturday, April 14, 1928
14
$19,000
13
Saturday, April 21, 1928
14
$19,000
14
Sunday, April 29, 1928 (8 Days)
16
$20,000
Totals
94 Days
Daily Average: $3,508
--
--
14 Weeks
Average Performance: $1,763
187
$329,750
Source: Film Daily Yearbook, 1929

Pepeto the Clown with a Chaplin imitator from the "Ballyhoo" prologue.
 
  Monday, April 29,1929 - Monday May 7, 1929 (1 Week):

THEATRE DARK
 
 
Premiere, Monday, May 7, 1928
Regular Engagement: Tuesday, May 8, 1928 - Sunday, June 24, 1928 (7 Weeks)
The Trail of '98
Starring Dolores del Rio and Ralph Forbes
Directed by Clarence Brown
A Metro-Goldywn-Mayer Picture presented in Fantom Screen
127 Minutes (original running time)

SID GRAUMAN PROLOGUE, "Northern Lights"
--
Program as detailed in Variety House Review, published Wednesday, May 16, 1928:

Overture - Grauman's Chinese Theatre Orchestra, Will Prior, Conductor / C. Sharpe Minor, Organist
--
Scene - Pioneer Dance Hall, Dawson City.
Time - 1898
--
LeRoy Sisters - dancers
Jimmy Ray - the dancing waiter
Queen and Harrison - dancing duo
Arnold Bob Blackner - the cowboy tenor
The Carsons - Texas Tommy dancers
Edna Covey - dancer
Chaz Chase - international comedy star
Chief Caupolican - famous Indian baritone from the Metropolitan Opera, New York.
--
FINALE
--
"The Trail of '98"


Wednesday, May 16, 1928

Film House Reviews - Grauman's Chinese, (Los Angeles) - Los Angeles, May 9.

"Northern Lights" Sid Grauman's prolog for "Trail of '98" (M-G) is am atmospheric entertainment affording wholesome amusement to those who fork over the $1.50 to enter these portals. Presentation was of the period with tunes thought tucked away in the memory of past generations brought to light again.

Set is the interior of a Dawson City dancehall and barroom. Grauman roamed Hollywood digging up the old boys who have "lace curtains" below the neck line. A Bar, gaming tables and short skirted damsels to look at too. Impressive to see some 60 so-called old timers on the rostrum.

Will Prior, house musical conductor, led the overture, a medley of numbers of the period. Then C Sharp Minor, at the organ, had a good theme song in "The Tale of '98." Opening had the mob in one of those old time dreamy waltzes. Upon conclusion the barker, or stage m. c., proceeded to introduce the talent staring off with the LeRoy Sisters, buck and wing. Then Jimmy Ray, a little hoofer who tore off one of those jazz eccentrics that tied the house into a knot. Queen and Harrison, old timers in a clog contest, pleased with Arnold Bob Blackner, cowboy tenor, singing an opratic number that passed in great shape. The Carsons brought back the Texas Tommy to score, followed by Edna Covey and her hoke toe work. Then Chaz Chase. They hadn't seen this comic out here so it was a push over. As the main stage feature Chief Caupolican, Indian baritone, did four numbers. He closed doing "Auld Lang Syne." This permitted the entire ensemble to join in for the finale which took place as the set, on rollers, split in the middle and was taken off as the voices died out and the picture began to flicker. Split of stage set to allow M-G's Fantom Screen to move down and back for the specticle sequences in "Trail."

Latest Grauman prolog will be a help to this film epic of Alsaka. — Ung. (Arthur Unger, Variety Los Angeles Bureau Chief.)

Grauman had decided to run the "Northern Lights" prologue and the film "The Trail of '98" as one continuous piece, without the usual intermission. When the Fantom Screen was dropped sometime during the run, Grauman re-ordered the act lineup, retitled the prologue "Yukon Nights," and inserted the traditional intermission between prologue and feature film. —ED
SID GRAUMAN PROLOGUE, "Yukon Nights"
--
Program as listed in the undated handout program for "The Trail of '98":

Overture - Grauman's Chinese Theatre Orchestra, Will Prior, Conductor / C. Sharpe Minor, Organist
--
Scene - Pioneer Dance Hall, Dawson City.
Time - 1898
--
Arnold Bob Blackner - the cowboy tenor
The Rangers - harmony octette
Jimmy Ray - the dancing waiter
The Carsons - Texas Tommy dancers
Chaz Chase - international comedy star
Chief Caupolican - famous Indian baritone from the Metropolitan Opera, New York.
--
FINALE

There will be an interval of eight minutes after the first part of the programme. The Chinese gong in the forecourt will be sounded to announce the beginning of the second part.
Cigarettes by Lickter's Chinese Smoke Shop / White Rose Spring Water used in this theatre
Ladies' Rest Room, Left of Foyer / Gentlemen's Smoking Room, Right of Foyer
Fire Notice: Look around you now, choose the nearest exit to your seat and in case of disturbance of any kind, to avoid the dangers of panic, WALK (do not run) to that exit.
If you live out of town patronize your local branch box office of Grauman's Chinese. 50 branches in Southern California. No brokerage charge for this service.
Keep your skin soft and smooth, and protects it against sun, dust, and wind. FROSTILLA LOTION Used by particular people for half a century - At All Stores 35¢ 50¢ $1.00
Southwest Olympic Finals and Carnival of World's Chanpion and Film Stars
--
Los Angeles Coliseum, Saturday, June 16 at 2 P.M.

Visit Alaska this summer. See White Pass, Dawson, Klondike, Yukon River, the Midnight Sun, Mt. McKinley, Columbia Glacier and 1,000 miles of magnificent scenery. Moderate Rates, Modern Service. Write for descriptive literature
--
Alaska Steamship Co.
307 W. 8th Street
TUcker 5150
Daily at: 2:15, and 8:15 PM


Friday, May 18, 1928:

Grauman's Chinese Theatre 1st Birthday Today

Reported Gross "The Trail of '98"
Week
Week Ending
Perfs.
Gross
1
Saturday, May 12, 1928 (6 Days)
11
$24,000
2
Saturday, May 19, 1928
14
$18,500
3
Saturday, May 26, 1928
14
$16,500
4
Saturday, June 2, 1928
14
$16,000
5
Saturday, June 10, 1928
14
$15,000
6
Saturday, June 16, 1928
14
$14,000
7
Sunday, June 24, 1928 (8 Days)
16
$15,000
Totals
49 Days
Daily Average: $2,429
--
--
7 Weeks
Average Performance: $1,227
97
$119,000
Source: Film Daily Yearbook, 1929


This undated program was presented to partons during the run of The Trail of '98; the acts listed in the prologue differ from those mentioned in the Variety House Review.
 
  Monday, June 25,1929 - Thursday, August 2, 1929 (5 Weeks):

THEATRE DARK
 
 
Premiere, Friday, August 3, 1928
Regular Engagement: Saturday, August 4, 1928 - Sunday, October 21, 1928 (11 Weeks)
White Shadows in the South Seas
Starring Monte Blue and Raquel Torres
Directed by W.S. Van Dyke
A Cosmopolitan Production / A Metro-Goldywn-Mayer Release
89 Minutes

SID GRAUMAN PROLOGUE, "The Tropics"

1. Overture—"White Shadows in the South Seas"
2. Sarah Padden in "Across the Border" A Vitaphone Drama
3. Fox Movietone News—See and hear latest news events
4. Clark and McCullough in "The Interview" A Fox Movietone Entertainment
5. Prologue—"The Tropics"
a. Prince Lei Lani and the Samoan Chieftains. Most famous of all South Sea dancers, brought to Hollywood by Sid Grauman especially for "The Tropics" prologue, with Leilehua (Aggie) Auld in dances of her native Marquesaa.
b. Sol Ho'opi'i and his native comrades.
c. The Three Brox Sisters. Internationally famous favorites.

Constantine Bakaleinikoff, Musical Director for Mr. Grauman
--
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
We urge all our patrons to remain seated at the conclusion of "White Shadows in the South Seas" to enjoy the introductions of the stars, who will tell you of their experiences during the making of the picture.

Bring the Kiddies to Grauman's Chinese: 25¢ any matinee, 50¢ any night except Saturday
White Rose Water served exclusively in forecourt
Cigarettes by Lickter
We call your attention to the GIGANTAPHONE: largest Victrola in the world, playing in the forecourt
Premiere advertised director James Cruze filming with director Fred Niblo introducing celebrities over microphone.
M-G-M's first sound picture.
Twice Daily at 2:20 and 8:20 PM

Reported Gross "White Shadows in the South Seas"
Week
Week Ending
Perfs.
Gross
1
Saturday, August 11, 1928 (9 Days)
17
$32,000
2
Saturday, August 18, 1928
14
$23,000
3
Saturday, August 25, 1928
14
$26,500
4
Saturday, September 1, 1928
14
$25,500
5
Saturday, September 8, 1928
14
$26,000
6
Saturday, September 15, 1928
14
$24,000
7
Saturday, September 22, 1928
14
$16,500
8
Saturday, September 29, 1928
14
$22,500
9
Saturday, October 6, 1928
14
$15,000
10
Saturday, October 13, 1928
14
$14,000
11
Sunday, October 21, 1928 (8 Days)
16
$13,300
Totals
80 Days
Daily Average: $2,979
--
--
11 Weeks
Average Performance: $1,499
159
$238,300
Source: Film Daily Yearbook, 1929
 
  Monday, October 22,1929 - Wednesday, October 31, 1929 (1 Week):

THEATRE DARK
 
 
Premiere, Thursday, November 1, 1928
Regular Engagement: Friday, November 2, 1928 - Wednesday, January 16, 1929 (12 Weeks)
Noah's Ark
Starring George O'Brien and Dolores Costello
Directed by Michael Curtiz
A Warner Bros. Vitaphone Talking Picture
135 Minutes

SID GRAUMAN PROLOGUE
Daily at: 2:15 and 8:15 PM
Children: 25¢ Matinees, 50¢ Evenings (except Saturday)
Premiere Tickets: $5.00


Wednesday, November 7, 1928

Film House Reviews - Grauman's Chinese, (Los Angeles) - Los Angeles, May 9.

Sid Grauman has gotten away from the lavish atmospheric prologs he has been in the habit of staging with his pictures. Reason: Grauman has the house wired; musicians cost lots of money in the pit and are not necessary where a picture has synchronization, as with “Noah’s Ark.” So Sid just put on an eight minute prelude and used the organ and a piano for musical accompaniment.

It opened in “two” with and ensemble of 36 voices, equally divided, standing outside the portals of the Ark, singing “Hear My Prayer,” by Mendelsohn-Bartholdy, with Stewart Brady, 14-year-old tenor as soloist. The Brady Boy has one of those clear semi-soprano voices, the main ingredients of which are pathos. Sure fire, with any audience.

Then the mixed chorus goes into “Unfold, Ye Portals,” from “Redemption” by Gounod, with effects showing the torrential waves and deluge spraying over the bodies of the chanters. Great singing ensemble with voices that can be heard and are distinct in rendition.

Third scene is a tabueaux (sic) revealed through transparency showing the interior of “Noah’s Ark,” with the passengers it had on the eventful journey, including the beasts, fowl, etc, that went with the party.

Corking good punch flash with the curtain brought together as the transparency blackens and the artificial waves wash over the songsters. Short, punchy and impressive for stage presentation. Did not cost much and with the music eliminated no doubt Grauman is saving close to $4,500 a week, with, in this instance, house not suffering on the economy as the picture is the draw.

For opener they had current Fox news and Vitaphone short with Albert Spaulding doing two numbers on the violin. — Ung. (Arthur Unger, Variety Los Angeles Bureau Chief.)

Photo by K. O. Rahmn of the Mary Pickford Corporation
 
© Copyright graumanschinese.org. Background Photo: From the Terry Helgesen Collection of the Theatre Historical Society, Elmhurst, Illinios.